The whale’s way

This is a wonderful blog for anyone interested in conservation or the ocean or whales (I love all three.) It is always a treat when the people who do these things write about them for layman; I may be a conservator but I am not involved with whale bones (though I almost was, my first college choice was oceanographer.) Enjoy! Kate

Once in a Whale

This blog entry allows a very visual insight into our conservation progress.

Following condition assessing and documenting the cetacean specimens, treatment plans were made (see previous blog ‘Treatment decisions, decisions, decisions‘). Hands-on conservation commenced with dry cleaning the specimens one by one, to remove over 100 years worth of accumulated dust. This was followed by the second treatment phase focusing on addressing degraded oil residues formed on the surface of the bones.
Along the way, a few discoveries were made…

1) Removing layers of dust with a vacuum and brush

2)    Reducing degraded oil residues on bone surfaces with an ammonia solution

3 Reducing degraded oil residues on cartilage/bone areas

4 Removing miscellaneous foreign matter 

5 Discoveries made during treatment

Early (honest) treatment evaluation

While we are finding that oils on the bone surface are efficiently being solubilised by treatment with ammonia, we do not know how far…

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About dkatiepowellart

hollywood baby turned beach gurl turned steel&glass city gurl turned cowgurl turned herb gurl turned green city gurl. . . artist writer photographer. . . cat lover but misses our big dogs, gone to heaven. . . buddhist and interested in the study of spiritual traditions. . . foodie, organic, lover of all things mik, partner in conservation business mpfconservation, consummate blogger, making a dream happen, insomniac who is either reading buddhist teachings or not-so-bloody mysteries or autobio journal thangs early in the morning when i can't sleep
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