Horseshoe Mystery!

The subtlety of the carving detail on the legs of the carousel horses is extraordinary!

Parker has cleverly placed his identifying mark, “C.W.Parker, Leavenworth, Kan,”
on the bottom of most horseshoes, such as these on the extra-large horse, Terri, above.


The horseshoes are a separate metal shoe on all but the tiny Parker Ponies, below.
Above, a medium older leg completely stripped;
you can see the place where the horseshoe attached with tiny nails.


You can also see the size of the feet on the Parker Ponies
changed over the years: the younger horse with big feet is on the left.

The Mystery:
Some of the horseshoes
have an additional mark!

MPFC cannot comprehend the
importance of the secondary marks.

On the Large Hunter Jumper above,
the Roman Numeral “V” exists…
Is this for “5”?  And why?
Or is it, laughably, a “V” for
Very Very old carousel horse?

We cannot detect a pattern: All the Large Black Stargazer’s extra marks are an “L”,
so you might think, a large horse, right?  Or is that a fifty-year-mark!?
Fifty of these models?  Fifty horseshoes made?
But why are the Water River Horse shoes labeled “L” and he is HUGE,  an extra-large!
And Terri is an extra-large and she has no extra identifying marks…

Plus there is another mystery… some of the horses have two marks on their shoes.  On the Water River Horse, three are marked “L” and one “V”!
Makes no sense, but we are certain the numerals mean something!

On the Medium Pinto Stargazer, above, “37”, the only numerals
that are not Roman, adorn all four shoes.  WHY?

Does anyone know why these
horseshoes are marked this way!?!
The horses are refusing to say!

Follow us for updates on the happenings at the stable!
We will continue to take you behind the scenes!  Currently we have:
Jantzen Beach Carousel Moving Day!
The Jantzen Beach Stable is Full!
Good Monday Morning!
and many others!
To keep abreast of our post, follow us here or
on Instagram (@mpfconservation) or on Facebook !

 

Written by Kate Powell  ©MPF Conservation.
May be printed for your own use ONLY, not for use on blogs without permission.

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JBC: Virtual Sketching!

Carousel horses have always delighted, even in the midst
of virtual games and E-ticket rides;
most of us don’t stop and look at them,
but are seduced by the Wurlitzer calling to us,
and the color and the action and the lights.

Kate runs a group of artists from around the world who paint from images
through a virtual meeting where they all paint a place together and enjoy the company
that comes from sharing.  Each month a different place is chosen and the
Virtual Sketchwalk group makes art from the photos offered for that walk.

This month we did images from the
Jantzen Beach Carousel!

*As you scroll through the slideshow the artists names will appear!*

Follow us for updates on the happenings at the stable!
We will continue to take you behind the scenes… Currently we have:
Jantzen Beach Carousel Moving Day,
The Jantzen Beach Stable is Full!, and the Parker Ponies!
To keep abreast of our posts, follow us here or
on Instagram (@mpfconservation) or on Facebook !

   

Written by Kate Powell  ©MPF Conservation.
May be printed for your own use ONLY, not for use on blogs without permission.

Posted in antiques, art, decorative motifs, musings, News, painted objects, wooden objects | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Happy Valentine’s Day

 
Happy Day!
Love is in the air in the stable!

He’s grinning cuz he’s in need of lots of TLC
and this is the place to get it!
Poor stagazer is chipped and broken and oh my, he is so wonderful…
I love Pintos!

   

Written by Kate Powell  ©MPF Conservation.
May be printed for your own use ONLY, not for use on blogs without permission.

Posted in antiques, art, conservation techniques, decorative motifs, Interim Report, painted objects, preservation, process, reparation, restoration techniques, wooden objects | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Parker Ponies

People don’t realize how tiny the Parker ponies are;
I can just about carry one under my arm!

I found a good way to show you…
Letting the studio cats in for a visit with Pinto Pony
(he’s got the turquoise and red bejeweled saddle),
while I did some rearranging and filing.

Pinto Pony on the floor scared Yaman into hiding,
but Savitri and Hari-Gibbs-Fred
thought he was a new playmate.

Last week the ponies were assessed.

It is a bit like a checkup:
every inch of them is reviewed,
and legs and tails
are jiggled to make sure they are
sturdy for a kid to climb on.
We list what needs to be repaired,
which can be a lot when you are 100,
and also to understand their history.

They are so beautiful!

We think these two ponies are different ages.
The White Jumper Pony with the turquoise fringed saddle with the horns is much older.
Her finish is more tattered and worn…
She has teeny tiny little feet, while Pinto Pony’s feet are a sturdy size up!
She’s been repaired many times, so much that her
legs and joints have gotten thick and lost definition…See that on the left?
She has more breaks or areas that need to be stabilized.


She is so old that her repairs were done with copper cladding
not unlike the extra leg we found laying about in storage.
we don’t know why, but doubt a woodworker would do that
because it messes with the structure.
We hope to unravel this mystery; we can do that if we get the chance to
repair a leg or tail with the copper cladding in place.


They look the same
until you really look.
The shape of the
Pinto’s head is fuller,
his eyes bigger.
White’s tail is sweeter,
more defined,
and she looks like
she is watching you…
A little wistfully?

Different carvers,
and even the functionality of
the seat shows thought —
Hers holds your bum better,
and has that nice horn.


But wait!  Pinto has jewels
not only on his romance side,
*that’s the side you see when
you look at the carousel*
but all the way around!

And he’s got that Cruella de Vil
streaking thang going on with his mane!
I mean, he is styling!

Pinto won’t be getting the
makeover that White will…
She’s got enough broken bones that
she’ll get some nice new paint on her!

Keep following us for these
updates on our progress…

 

Written by Kate Powell  ©MPF Conservation.
May be printed for your own use ONLY, not for use on blogs without permission.

Posted in antiques, art, conservation techniques, decorative motifs, Interim Report, painted objects, preservation, process, reparation, restoration techniques, wooden objects | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Good Monday Morning!


“Good Morning!”

Yup, we talk to them, saying good morning when we come in…

I’ll worry when they start talking back!

Water Spirit Dappled Grey Horse from the
Jantzen Beach Carousel…

Did you have a favorite?

   

Written by Kate Powell  ©MPF Conservation.
May be printed for your own use ONLY, not for use on blogs without permission.

Posted in antiques, art, conservation techniques, decorative motifs, Interim Report, painted objects, preservation, process, reparation, restoration techniques, wooden objects | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

The Jantzen Beach Stable is Full!

After what was the best
difficult moving days we’ve ever had
(go here read about that),
the horses and many shields
and cresting boards
are in our studio,
which now has a large room
called the “Jantzen Beach Stable”.

When we come into our secure lobby,
the black peekaboo “Portland Horse” greets us.

The dappled grey water horse and an armored horse share the lobby, though
I admit they are a bit dwarfed in stature by the Portland Horse’s amazing mane.

What a joy to see coming into work!


The Stable holds 8-12 horses.
This is where most of the work will be performed.

The Parker Ponies rest on famous Mason Monterey sofas
in the room where furniture from the historic Frank Crowe Estate resides.
The horses (and carousel) were born within a decade of the lovely colorful
Monterey furniture and they feel simpatico.

The long cresting boards are laid out for assessment, above.

It’s not all about the horses, though.
Chariots and shields are covered with 
lions and roosters and cherubs and posies…
It is a joy to be around them!

Follow us for updates on the happenings at the stable!
We will continue to take you behind the scenes!
You can also follow us on Instagram (@mpfconservation) or on Facebook !

 

Written by Kate Powell  ©MPF Conservation.
May be printed for your own use ONLY, not for use on blogs without permission.

Posted in antiques, decorative motifs, Interim Report, painted objects, preservation, reparation, restoration techniques, wooden objects | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Jantzen Beach Carousel Moving Day!

Note: The images all have notations if you scroll through.

“Nicole, you want us to do whaaaat?”

“Yes, that’s right, first, this mess has to be cleaned up!”

We first arrived to assess
the horses, because it starts
with the horses, the stars of
the show!  It was to be a
simple assessment of the Jantzen Beach Carousel Horses toward proper restoration.
This is what we found:
an itty bitty walkway (cover your pants in grease as you went) where we had to duck and bob and look around shields and beams and poles underfoot, to see the horses tucked way back into the left corner.

Mitchell is standing on an 18×30-inch cleared stand-able space, above.
I am immediately charmed by the horses lined up, so touchable!

Actually, Nicole didn’t give us
marching orders but it makes for
a great story. We had to clear
paths to inspect, let alone MOVE,
the horses for assessment.  Quickly
the scope of the assessment changed,
including all decorative objects —
defined as anything not mechanical
(another firm is handling
that part of the assessment.)
Now our goal became clearing a
safe path to all the decorative objects,
even those deeply buried and
completely inaccessible, such as the
two bench seats (chariots)
and the 9-foot Cresting Boards, right.

The four moving men were divided into two groups.
We spent the whole first day stacking floor and ceiling wood at
the right end to open the blocked space, while at the left end we were moving
the tightly packed horses and shields out onto the main floor in order
to re-stack the shields out of the paths.
By the end of the long day we had reached our impossible goal,
and could actually walk around without tripping.

NOTE: Specs of white floating in the images are dust in the storage facility.

We also found the smaller bench, the Lion Chariot!
(You can see how the guys had to move in a tight short cramped space.)

Two more days!

Again, Mitchell and I worked left side / right side.
On the right side they finally were able to move the huge stack of 8×8 beams temporarily.
They carefully inched the huge heavy double-bench chariot out,
and carried it where it would be loaded into the moving truck.
Then re-stacking…
We needed to share this space with the operational assessment crew.

Right side, the rounding boards were moved and assessed, then restacked.
We decided the cresting boards should be stacked in front of them.

On the left side, several beams needed to move out onto the floor for assessment,
and also to allow us to move the cresting boards out for repositioning.
Above, Vitaliy and Tim lifting the decorative beams on one side,
while Joe lifts and steadies the beams in the back.
Several decorative beams were moved out for inspection and assessment.

Finally the cresting boards were stacked neatly in front of the rounding boards,
last image; two came back to the studio.

Day two, I assessed several items that will not come back with us to the studio, as they are either too long or too heavy: Beams, mirrored shields, painted shields.

Our first load also leaves for the studio:
Cherub shields, decorative mirrored shields, cresting boards.
A couple of Parker Ponies ride in my back seat!

We leave that night with the storage place in heavenly order, above;
a few objects must go back into the storage so it can be locked up.

End of second day, heavenly order!

Third day, the horses.

We chose our initial horses on day two when we finally had room to
move around (last image).  We wanted to take two of each size,
but also wanted a sampling of the types of damages on all the horses.

By day three we had our options, and final choices were made.
The guys carefully loaded the wonderful horses, above,
and the HUGE chariots and other parts into the truck!
Fifteen (mostly) badly damaged horses came back with us.

All the lovely horses were patted 
with a promise to be back SOON.

Before and after, above.
  Marie Kondo has nothing on us!

Some of the horses that were chosen, above.

Next post, we show you behind the scenes in
The Jantzen Beach Stable is Full!

Players in this first phase: Nicole Possert, Henry Kunowski (both Restore Oregon),
Adam Todd (Portland’s Best Movers), with Joe Mabbott, Tim Carter,
Sean Morgan, Vitaliy Kolyvanov, and of course, Mitchell Powell and I!

Follow us on Facebook
or on Instagram @mpfconservation!

Written by Kate Powell  ©MPF Conservation.
May be printed for your own use ONLY, not for use on blogs without permission.

Posted in antiques, conservation techniques, decorative motifs, Interim Report, painted objects, preservation, process, wooden objects | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 26 Comments