Process: Circus Ball 3

We left the Circus Ball as it had been
prepped for its paint layers.

I am so sorry that all my images of the ball sanded smooth are very blurry!
Happily, the detailed images are in sharp!

The first coat of paint dragged as it was applied over the Araldyte.
I checked in with our client, because one problem with our treatment is that
we never were able to see the ball as it was before the stripping caused the wood to lift.
I could not tell if my assumption of the ball’s surface was correct.
I doubted it would have been extremely smooth,
because a performer has to be able to stand, grip and roll on the ball.

Our client told me that the surface looked
very much as it had originally!

W15 12 8 JK CIRCUS PAINT 1

I thought that the paint build-up might be more interesting, but truthfully, it is Gamblin’s Silver oil paint, and each coat looks close to the same — so not a photogenic moment!

W15 12 12 JK CIRCUS PAINT 1yIn all, four coats of paint are on this ball, and it is curing.

Next will come the blue star!

w15 jk aunt circus ball banner

©MPF Conservation.  May be printed for your own use.
May be reposted if our url + copyright is used as reference.

 

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Restore Oregon Endangered Places 2016, The First Set

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 300This is part of a series for Restore Oregon

by one of our partners, Kate Powell (artist too, bio below!)

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75

Thanks to Drew Nasto, Craig Powell, and for the various locations for allowing me to use historic images to place into sketch format to commemorate the projects!

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Kate is sketching many of Oregon’s Most Endangered Places
for 2016 in a folded journal. The following locations are shown in this set:
the Rivoli Theater; the Jantzen Beach Carousel; the Wong Laundry Building;
the Chateau at the Oregon Caves NM; and the Fort Rock Homestead Museum.

W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 002W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 021W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 011W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 032Each place is shown below:

W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 003W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 023The Rivoli Theater was built as a brick commercial storefront in 1900.
It opened as a theater in 1922, and became an important gathering and entertainment center in downtown Pendleton. Vaudeville and silent movies and talking Hollywood films played into the 1940s. Television’s popularity in the 1950’s took a toll on the Rivoli,
but there are now plans to turn it into a cultural center once again.

The  images were mostly in black and white or sepia tones;
Kate played with color and using the teeny color images as reference!
The photograph used was taken possibly over a roof line, and the edges of signs were her stopping point, and they played well into the edge of the horses tail and feet.

W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 006W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 028The Jantzen Beach Carousel layout was also invented from many images,
both  historical and from newspapers and blog posts.

The carousel was built by the Charles Wallace Parker Company in Leavenworth, Kansas,  in 1921. C.W. Parker, the “American Amusement King,” built only three or four carousels the size of the Jantzen Beach Carousel.  It lived for a short time in California before moving to the amusement park built by the swimsuit family in 1927.  The horses are spectacular, and many were hand-carved by inmates of the Leavenworth Penitentiary. The amusement park’s popularity peaked during the 1940s, and it was largely dismantled, but the merry-go-round was in use until recently.  Portlanders have fond memories of the carousels, and when posting updates to friends, many remember riding the horses or have memories of their parents talking about trips to visit the horses on the merry-go-round.  Kate had no images showing the colors on the outside of the carousel.

The Merry-Go-Round is no longer present on site.  Restore Oregon is working with local partners to find strategy to restore and relocate. So many photographs have been taken of the exterior horses it was easy to sketch her horse.   She chose to draw the horse she would want to ride!  Kate hopes to do so someday — she loves merry-go-rounds!

W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 007W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 030The Wong Laundry Building, located at 239 N.W. Third Ave, Portland,
was built in 1908 by Alexander Ewart.  It is symbolic of immigrant struggles and work ethic in Portland’s Chinatown and Nihonmachi, or Japan-town.  Vacant and water-damaged since a fire in 1970, members of the community hope to restore it
as a combined commercial space, event space, and interactive museum.
Kate guessed at the colors, looking to the current buildings in Chinatown for clues.

W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 014W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 036The six-story Chateau at the Oregon Caves NM was built in 1934.
It has been featured in the Great Lodges of the National Parks, and is part of a larger development that includes a chalet, several employee and rental cottages, and a visitor’s center, all under consideration for National Register status as part of a district.
The buildings were all constructed between 1923 and 1941.  The Chateau is the most outstanding of these structures.  The building also holds one of the largest collections of Mason Monterey furniture, also in need of expert conservation.

MPF Conservation has a long history with the Chateau at the Oregon Caves NM.
Having treated thirty pieces of Mason Monterey furniture and having lived nearby for many years, we know and love the Chateau.  The image of the decks (destroyed by snow loads) was a black and white historical photo, and Kate laid color in as we know it.

The A-frame chair shown is the one surviving historic A-frame which survived the flood of 1964, probably because a guest had taken it from the dining room to their bedroom.
MPF Conservation used the lovely A-frame as the model for the design of the stripped broken A-frames, and did diligence to determine the colors used on the others.
We repaired the original, and it is now part of the museum collection.
Kate used the chair to balance the horse in the layout.

W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 016W15 12 2 RO ENDANGERED PLACES A 039Located in Fort Rock, Oregon, the Fort Rock Homestead Museum image derives
from Craig Powell’s photograph.  The Fort Rock Valley Historical Society conceived
and promoted the development of a homestead museum to preserve the
Fort Rock Valley’s pioneer heritage. As a result of the society’s efforts, the
Fort Rock Valley Historical Homestead Museum was opened in 1988.
It is a collection of original homestead era buildings assembled in a village setting, including the Fort Rock General Store.  Most of the buildings contain historic items used by local homesteaders including furniture, dishes, household products, and tools.

Inked sketches on a handmade Arches Journal with (mostly)
Platinum Carbon pen, Pentel Brush Pen, or Pilot Parallel pen 1.5;
Super5 or De Artramentis Document inks;
Daniel Smith, QoR, Holbien and Greenleaf & Blueberry Watercolors.

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75

I agree to Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 4.0 International License, which you can learn more about by visiting the site, or,
visit my web page for a more user-friendly summary on my terms.
My images/blog posts may be reposted; please link back to dkatiepowellart.
Photographic images by known photographers Drew Nasto and Craig Powell.

Posted in architecture, house museums, preservation | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Restore Oregon Celebration Dinner, The Event

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 300
Mitchell and Kate attended the Restoration Celebration to raise money for the
the 2016 Most Endangered Places, and to hear the winners of the 2015 Demuro Awards,
as the guest of one of our clients, Karla Pearlstein of Restoring History.
Restore Oregon is an excellent place to put your time and dollars toward preservation.

This is part of a series for Restore Oregon
by one of our partners, Kate Powell (artist too, bio below!)

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75

Thanks to Drew Nasto for letting me use his images
to place into sketch format to commemorate the night!

W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 001W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 005W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 009W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 012W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 023W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 025W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 021W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 035W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 036When an artist draws, we remember.
When we draw details, we get to know our subjects intimately.

W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 004The simple act of pen to paper allows me to cement
an event forever in my mind and heart.

I remember standing with Mitchell listening to the guitarist,
Matthew’s and Karla’s and Peggy’s faces,
the lovely conversations at the table and after,
a new friendship made, a loyal superintendent,
many patrons of our business dressed up for
a night on the town, and the gift given!  Thank You!

W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 025I understand the decorative details of the ballroom design
(my architectural background helps here).
I studied the stunning mandala on the hand-painted jacket
from the Pacific Northwest College of Art,
and listened to the stories,
so many great speakers and stories
of buildings lost and buildings saved,
especially Max Williams’ story of watching
a building come down in his home town as a boy. 

W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 035With the promise of more buildings to be saved,
I watched many people pledge their faith and dollars
in Restore Oregon and our built history.

W15 12 1 RO CELEBRATION ROOM 038Stay tuned for the Buildings, coming soon!

         Inked sketches on a handmade Arches Journal with (mostly)
Platinum Carbon pen, Pentel Brush Pen, or Pilot Parallel pen 1.5;
Super5 or De Atramentis Document inks;
Daniel Smith, QoR, Holbien and Greenleaf & Blueberry Watercolors.

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75

I agree to Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 4.0 International License, which you can learn more about by visiting the site, or,
visit my web page for a more user-friendly summary on my terms.
My images/blog posts may be reposted; please link back to dkatiepowellart.
Photographs by Drew Nasto or others as noted, with permission.

Posted in architecture, history, house museums, preservation, restoration techniques | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Restore Oregon Celebration Dinner, Kate’s Process

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 300
Mitchell and Kate attended the Restoration Celebration to raise money for the
the 2016 Most Endangered Places, and to hear the winners of the 2015 Demuro Awards,
as the guest of one of our clients, Karla Pearlstein of Restoring History.
Restore Oregon is an excellent place to put your time and dollars toward preservation.

This is the beginning of a series for Restore Oregon
by one of our partners, Kate Powell (artist too!)

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75

Kate teamed up with Drew Nasto (photographer) and Denise Bartlett (Restore Oregon)
to collect great images to place into sketch format to commemorate the night!
This post is a teaser, to show the process of moving from great pictures to sketch.

 In this instance, I started with Drew’s excellent images of the Demuro Award plates
and lovely image of Peggy Moretti, Executive Director, Restore Oregon.

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 007W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 009 Pencil first, both watercolor and graphite.
(If you use pencil first, and erase some or all of it, use a clean eraser!
If it is a knead-able eraser then pull it into a clean place!)
Moving to a fine point fountain pen, then a Japanese brush pen.

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 013I laid in ink to unify the background, Super5 Dublin and Australia.
It is so different working on really nice watercolor paper;
I am usually in a Moleskin or Stillman & Birn journal:
great journals but obviously not like good watercolor paper!

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 015 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 019 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 022 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 014I began layering washes,
Quinacridone Gold and Yavapei and Piemonite and Sepia,
Sap Green, and Imperial Purple. I tested colors on a piece of the good paper, to see how the inks reacted to the good watercolor paper and to watch the colors build to the deep colored piece I ended with. (The glittery shimmer in the images is wet paint. No sparkles were added).

I am no portraitist, so it is nerve-wracking to do someone’s portrait.
But I’m learning!  Finished piece: 1/4 of the folded journal, sans writing, below.

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024
Process slide show below!

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         Inked sketches on a handmade Arches Journal with (mostly)
Platinum Carbon pen, Pentel Brush Pen, or Pilot Parallel pen 1.5;
Super5 or De Atramentis Document inks;
Daniel Smith, QoR, Holbien and Greenleaf & Blueberry Watercolors.

W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75 W15 11 26 RO Peggy Plate 024 BANNER 75

I agree to Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 4.0 International License, which you can learn more about by visiting the site, or,
visit my web page for a more user-friendly summary on my terms.
My images/blog posts may be reposted; please link back to dkatiepowellart.
Photographs by Drew Nasto or others as noted, with permission.

Posted in architecture, history, house museums, preservation | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Process: Circus Ball 4

W15 12 12 JK CIRCUS PAINT 1y
We left the Circus Ball with
four layers of Gamblin Silver Oil Paint.
Time to add the Cobalt Blue star!

Who says one never uses High School math?
Kate used Geometry to create the template for the proper sizes star.

W15 12 21 JK CIRCUS PAINT 004
Kate transferred the star to the Circus Ball.

Once on the ball, Mitchell and Kate both felt the star had to be a bit bigger.
Remember, we had no opportunity to measure the star, so had only the image above to judge the size of the star in relation to the size of the ball.

W15 12 28 JK CIRCUS PAINT 004
The first coat of paint was dull and streaky.  It is matte because I am using
Gamblin’s Fastmatte Cobalt Blue Oil Paint, to aid in the dry time.
We will varnish the entire ball at the end of several coats.

W15 12 28 JK CIRCUS PAINT 010
When wet, it gives an example of
how it will look when varnished!

 

W15 12 28 JK CIRCUS PAINT 007
After curing, I’ll flip the ball over and begin on the other side!

w15 jk aunt circus ball banner

©MPF Conservation.  May be printed for your own use.
May be reposted if our url + copyright is used as reference.

Posted in conservation techniques, decorative motifs, Interim Report, painted objects, preservation, reparation, restoration techniques, wooden objects | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Process: Circus Ball 2

W15 JK CIRCUS BALL 010Before I start showing you the restoration process, first let’s take a moment to
marvel at this extraordinary ball.  I rarely post full-size images, but the texture
on this damaged ball is so beautiful, and the construction so extraordinary,
that the one above is full size.  (Double click to get the full effect.)

The ball was made with pieces of wood which were pieced together
(probably with hide glue) then rounded into the ball shape.
Square head nails were used, and then there is the interesting rectangular fastener, above.
I am not a woodworker, and so I am not good at telling you more than this.
(Woodworkers may weigh in as they like!)

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Our process for this project is to repair the damage done by the stripper,
then to paint the ball using the same type of paints, bringing it to its glory days.
The repainting is restoration, since the ball was stripped, rather than conservation.
This ball will not be used again, however, but sit on our client’s desk.

W15 8 20 JK CIRCUS B4 STUDIO 007W15 JK CIRCUS BALL 016As we said in the first installment, the ball was stripped inappropriately.
This led to layers upon layers of lifted desiccated older wood.
Older wood cannot handle the harsh chemical strippers,
which tend to separate the molecules and make them far more brittle.
These layers had to be secured.
One way was to meticulously glue each layer down using hide glue,
which is impractical, given the hundreds of lifted pieces.

W15 JK CIRCUS BALL 026

We used a museum-approved consolidate, which both filled under the layers,
and also was able to fill huge chunks which fell out during the stripping process.
The consolidate was pulled under the layers, above, and acted as both a glue and fill.

W15 JK CIRCUS BALL 037W15 JK CIRCUS BALL 030Once completed, the ball was left to cure for a few days.

After curing, ridges were smoothed first using chisels, then the ball was sanded to
take the excess consolidate down to the surface.  You can once again see the ridges
of the wood and the fasteners, both of which my clients wanted to see.
He was not interested in a new, smooth ball.

It is now ready for its first layers of silver oil paint!

w15 jk aunt circus ball banner

©MPF Conservation.  May be printed for your own use.
May be reposted if our url + copyright is used as reference.

Posted in antiques, conservation techniques, Interim Report, painted furniture, preservation, process, reparation, restoration techniques, wooden objects | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

The Sketchpack Project: MPF Conservation Tools

ABOUT SKETCHPACK: The project began in 2011. The original idea was to get folks to draw daily. The Sketchpack is a small zigzag journal with two usable sides, allowing one to sketch on both sides of 15 ‘pages’ to complete the month of August. There was much enthusiasm and the project is now repeated yearly in August, with a Facebook page for us to share as we go along.  (The page is closed once the sketching begins, so if you would like to do it next year you need to check out the pages in June or July.)  There is an Exhibition held in October filling all four windows of the Artsauce Studio in Observatory, Cape Town, South Africa of mostly locals Sketchpacks!

Kate here: I’ve participated before, but never sent off my submission.
This year I am sketching items we use in our business.
This packet will go to Artsauce in Cape Town for their exhibition!

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 001 2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 002
It is always fun when we have a project that needs beautiful passementerie.
Oddly, many people who love antiques are afraid to appoint them properly!

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 003
A very old tool which we use more for removing tacks than staples.

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 004
My favorite colorful tool.  However, it doesn’t work as well as the older guns.

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 005DSC05781

I just have to show you what I was trying to draw below.
Gads what was I thinking?  Woven threads?
I didn’t think it through before I began!
I may have another go at another one before this is over — this is all about the drawing!

A chunk of beeswax used all the time.
We run twines used in upholstery through the beeswax, an ancient tradition.
And Mitchell carves oms in everything (but not in our antiques!)

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 006 007
This is the staple remover we actually use!  Much more effective!

I turned this both ways so you could read it easily.

A regulating needle it a very long thick needle with a sharp point
(but not like a sewing needle sharp) and would make a good weapon!

My Sanding Stick is the best invention.
It makes it much easier to remove just one little area for touch-up.

Some are Mitchell’s tools exclusively, and some we share.
I never touch the Sewing Gauge.  I hand sew!

Mitchell is the one who uses the Magic Writing tool:
Chew on it and it magically solves all your problems!

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 011
Part of working is taking breaks.  I paint, Mitchell plays his guitar.

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 012
Gads what would the studio be without threads. We have a wall of huge spools that Mitchell uses on the machines, and two bins of tiny spools and treasure trove of very old threads given to us by a nurse whose patient was dying — a very old seamstress. Her old threads have saved the day many times when we needed an older color 100% cotton thread. It is difficult to match the original colors, faded to be what they are today if they are seen.  This is one of the most difficult jobs, matching threads!

I tend to do the hand-sewing; Mitchell uses machines.

We have to use historically compatible threads, and so, rarely use polyester threads.
Silk, Cotton, linen, rayon — this is more typical.

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 013
Leather tools, in this case, a hand-held hole punch which couples with a small hammer and you tap-tap-tap the holes.  Simple and effective.  And sinew for lacing,
which, when I use for making leather bags I usually bead over.
We also have this huge hand-held contraption that but getting it on a teeny page would be a chore — and frankly, even Mitchell tend to use the small easy simple tools!
The punch has removable tips.  I could do several pages on leather tools alone!

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 014
How much chalk could a chalk chuck chuck if a chalk chuck could chuck chalk?
Another beautiful tool.  Keeps you from putting chalk all over fabrics!

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 015

WE ARE ALWAYS LOOKING FOR THIS TWINE!
HINT-HINT!

One of Mitchell’s favorite twines from the 20’s to the 50’s: for some strange reason the boxes are collectible without the twine!  Go figure.  Every so often I find a box with twine for him.  We work with many different twines, most often Italian or French.

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 016
A seriously wicked leather knife that slices through leather like butter,
and leather sewing tool for hand stitching.

This is the tack remover I see Mitchell use most often; maybe it is the gentle curve that allows it to roll against the furniture just so and not mar the frame easily.

Mitchell uses the Osbourne webbing stretcher all the time.
The rubber that acts like a sticky yoga mat and protects the furniture can be replaced as needed.  The big tines push into the webbing and assist them in being stretched to the proper tension, while Mitchell spits tacks.  YOU HEARD ME.  Spits tacks.

REAL MEN SPIT TACKS!

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 0192015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 020
I have to do these two days together too . . .
The pretty, sweet, funny pincushions (he has several, above) versus the workhorse magnetic kind.    You can pick up 100 pins when you spill them on the floor!
They save my bare feet — and I am always kicking off my shoes.
Once a beachgurl, always a beachgurl!

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 021
Leather strap fence and cutter, bought for the project below, Crater Lake NP, leather strapping for many Imperial “Monterey” woven leather chairs!.

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 022I love the “parrot” pincers —
I see a parrot every time Mitchell uses them!

The “parrot” pincers were used below to pull nails and decorative nails
from the Oregon Caves Mason Monterey chairs.

2011 2 10 117B2 LEATHER EXCAV 752015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 023
The “Slow Sony” is a dying camera,
and I grieve it and will miss it.

I am not thrilled with our new Sony.  Dufus designers.

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 024-025
Lie-Nielsen is one of Mitchell’s favorite tools company’s, but since the company
made the decision not to stock with good woodworking stores but only sell online, he
has stopped buying them.  It is too much work to shop online, then have it shipped
several days at great expense; often he finds a need he has to fulfill NOW.

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 026 2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 027
Borrowing tools from other venues, in this case, contractor’s tools.

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 028
Had to try this again.  MUCH happier with the results!

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 029
BEEP-BEEP! 

I get a hit of roadrunner and the coyote every time I see this anvil!

2015 8 SKETCHPACK PROJECT 030
And for the last, kitchen tools stolen for use in the studio.
Pan scrapers, Pyrex® Mixing cups (they take heat), nice handled scrubby brushes.
I put my foot down the day he wanted my good mixer.
Now when we go to the kitchen store we buy them for the studio too!

THIS MONTH AND THE SKETCHPACK PROJECT
ARE COMING TO AN END.

THIS HAS BEEN A TOTAL PLEASURE!
THANK YOU ARTSAUCE!

Drawn on an unknown paper itty-bitty folding journal with (mostly)
the fine point Platinum Carbom pen and Daniel Smith watercolors.

        

I agree to Creative Commons Attribution-Non-Commercial 4.0 International License, which you can learn more about by visiting the site, or,
visit my web page for a more user-friendly summary on my terms.
My images/blog posts may be reposted; please link back to dkatiepowellart.

Posted in antiques, conservation techniques, funny funny, preservation, reparation, restoration techniques, tailor, tools, upholstery, wooden objects | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,